Spencer Gulf Ecosystem & Development Initiative Workshops

Workshops to discuss the progress on the Spencer Gulf Ecosystem and Development Initiative (SGEDI) are being conducted in regional areas and Adelaide over the next four weeks.

This is a four year program, led by the Environment Institute at the University of Adelaide. The program aims to provide all stakeholders with access to independent and credible information. We seek to enable positive environmental decision making for groups and individuals associated with the Gulf.

Cumulative Impact and the Spencer Gulf System

Cumulative Impact and the Spencer Gulf System

Workshop locations:

·         Port Augusta – Tuesday 18 February – Charles Chappell room, Standpipe Golf Motor Inn, Corner Eyre and Stuart Highways from 1.30pm until 4.30pm

·         Whyalla – Tuesday 11 March  – Training Room, Whyalla Library, 7-9 Ekblom Street from 1.00pm until 4.30pm

·         Wallaroo – Tuesday 25 February – Supper Room, Wallaroo Town Hall, Section 1634 Irwine St from 1.00pm until 4.30pm

·         Port Lincoln – Wednesday 26 February – Lecture Theatre, Lincoln Marine Science Centre, 1 Hindmarsh St from 1.00pm until 4.00pm

·         Adelaide – Friday 7 March – Seminar Room West, Masonic Hall, North Terrace TBC.

The aim of these workshops is to discuss the work that has been undertaken in the last twelve months. This includes:

  • a summary of the findings from the last series of stakeholder workshops that were conducted at the end of 2012
  • a review of the scientific knowledge about the Spencer Gulf’s marine environment
  • an assessment of key knowledge gaps
  • pathways for the next period of research

Download the Spencer Gulf Ecosystem and Development Initiative Summary (PDF)

In order to cater, we would be pleased if you could RSVP with your chosen location before 14 February by email to clair.crowley@adelaide.edu.au

Feel free to contact the Environment Institute for more information on (08) 8313 0543.

2014 SA Climate Change Adaptation Showcase

ccadapt header

Date: February 13th & 14th, 2014
Time: 4:30pm – 5:30pm
Venue: The Science Exchange, 55 Exchange Place, Adelaide
Cost: $250 for two day registration including dinner. Student discounts apply.
RSVP: – Click here to register your attendance.

You will hear the latest in climate science research and also how practitioners from around South Australia are working at the local level to determine the best response for their region.

The expert panel:

-       Roger B Street from the UK Climate Impacts Programme at Oxford University (UKCIP)
Roger is a leading international adaptation expert and will be hosted (via live-feed) from the UK. He leads the technical and scientific work at UKCIP aimed at guiding risk, vulnerability and adaptation assessments.

-       Dr Karl Braganza, Director of Climate Monitoring Section, Bureau of Meteorology
Karl’s research is centred on understanding climate variability and change using climate modelling, instrumental observations and palaeo-climate evidence.

-       Dr Susannah Eliott, CEO, Australian Science Media Centre (AusSMC)
The AusSMC works with the news media to inject more evidence-based science into public discourse.

-       Dr Peter Hayman, Principal Scientist in Climate Applications, South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI)
Peter has been recently working on impacts and adaptation to climate change in the irrigated wine grape and low-rainfall grains industries.

-       Professor Will Steffen, Climate Council
Peter’s research interests span fields of climate and Earth System science, with an emphasis on sustainability and climate change.

-       Dr Russell Wise, Sustainability Economist, CSIRO
Russell’s work is focussed on understanding the interplay between institutions, values and knowledge to enable communities in Australia and overseas to adapt to climate change.

Learn from the experts how to translate the science into action!

For more information, view the program.

 

 

Research Tuesdays: “Where will we source our Energy?” presentation now online

The latest Research Tuesdays presentation Where will we source our energy? is now online. This was a special end of year event featuring five panellists, including Professor Barry Brook, Director of Climate Science at the Environment Institute.

The topic of this presentation is particularly pertinent after last weeks heatwave, during which blackouts were experienced across the country due to high demand for power. The cost of running air-conditioning in what are predicted to be more frequent heatwaves is an issue that will inevitably also focus our attention further to exactly where we will source our energy from in the future.

Other members of the expert panel included Professor Graham “Gus” Nathan, mechanical engineer and founding Director of the University of Adelaide’s Centre for Energy Technology as well as Associate Professor David Lewis (PhD CEng FIChemE), a chemical engineer in the University of Adelaide’s School of Chemical Engineering.

city lights

Flickr: Ralph Walker

Guest Speaker: Professor Stephen J. Hawkins

The School of Earth & Environmental Sciences and the Environment Institute present a seminar by Professor Stephen J. Hawkins from the University of Southampton in the UK, where he is the Dean of the Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences & Professor of Natural Sciences.

Delegates on the rocky shore with Professor Steve Hawkins

Delegates on the rocky shore with Professor Stephen Hawkins (Source: itrs2011.org)

The Seminar is entitled “100 years of observations from the Marine Biological Association” and Prof Hawkins promises to give some insight into the role of temperate reefs as tractable systems for testing ideas in ecology. Those working in the field may also be reminded while conducting experiments and formulating hypotheses; not to forget the older work (even if inconveniently published in French) and to have fun, “as it is a privilege to be a paid up rock pooler and experimental natural historian”.

Prof Hawkins comes to Adelaide fresh from the 10th International Temperate Reefs Symposium in Perth, where he delivered a plenary entitled “Looking back and looking forward: the role of surveys, experiments and importance of natural history in temperate reef ecology”. We hope you can join us to learn all about the kind of information that can be gleaned from reef systems and how this information could be used to shed light on issues such as climate change, biodiversity and the impact of shellfisheries.

When: Monday 20th January 2014
Where: 715 Conference Room, Ingkarni Wardli Building, University of Adelaide
Time: 3:00pm

All welcome.

Podcast for Kathy Belov seminar now available.

The podcast from the seminar by Kathy Belov Can we save the Tasmanian devil from extinction? is now available.

The iconic Tasmanian devil is under threat. Not only does it face traditional conservation pressures, a devastating facial tumor is wiping out populations across Tasmania. The species is the focus of numerous conservation efforts and research, but can the devil be saved from extinction? Professor Katherine Belov, ARC Future Fellow and Professor of Comparative Genetics at the University of Sydney,  explores the fate of the Tasmanian devil.Tasmanian Devil. Image - Flickr/Scott Nolan

Tasmanian Devil. Image – Flickr/Scott Nolan

Katherine Belov is Professor of Comparative Genomics at the Faculty of Veterinary Science of the University of Sydney and contributing author of the 2012 Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics. In this seminar, Prof. Belov discusses:

  • the origins of the Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD), a transmissible cancer that has already caused the disappearance of 85 percent of the species and could lead to its extinction in the wild within 25 years.
  • what is known of the tumor based on its genomics
  • why it is transmitted between animals without causing immune recognition in the devils
  • conservation efforts to save the species from extinction.

Podcast download [50 MB]

Can we save the Tasmanian devil from extinction?

SEMINAR

The iconic Tasmanian devil is under threat. Not only does it face traditional conservation pressures, a devastating facial tumor is wiping out populations across Tasmania. The species is the focus of numerous conservation efforts and research, but can the devil be saved from extinction?

Professor Katherine Belov, ARC Future Fellow and Professor of Comparative Genetics at the University of Sydney,  will explore the fate of the Tasmanian devil in a lunchtime seminar.

When: 12 Noon, 22 November, 2013

Where: Horrace Lamb Lecture Theatre

Tasmanian Devil. Image - Flickr/Scott Nolan

Tasmanian Devil. Image – Flickr/Scott Nolan

Katherine Belov, Professor of Comparative Genomics at the Faculty of Veterinary Science of the University of Sydney and contributing author of the 2012 Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics, Prof. Belov will discuss the origins of the Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD), a transmissible cancer that has already caused the disappearance of 85 percent of the species and could lead to its extinction in the wild within 25 years. She will talk about what is known of the tumor based on its genomics, why it is transmitted between animals without causing immune recognition in the devils, and what are the conservation efforts to save the species from extinction.

Experts in Sustainable Development: ‘Cents and Sustainability’ – Is there still a first mover advantage for South Australia?’

RSVP – Click here to register your attendance. By Friday 8 November.

Date: November 14th 2013
Time: 4:30pm – 5:30pm
Venue: The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Napier G04, Napier Building, Ground Floor. Speaker: Charlie Hargroves, Sustainability Development Fellow (ECIC University of Adelaide), Senior Research Fellow (Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute), and co-founder of The Natural Edge Project.

The sustainability wave is well and truly upon us and many are now asking if there is still a first mover advantage that can justify efforts needed to overcome the lingering challenges and barriers. In this talk Charlie will draw on a series of books co-authored with The Natural Edge Project (including ‘Cents and Sustainability’ that was ranked the 5th top sustainability book in 2010 by Cambridge University), along with over a decade of industry and government action research, to highlight areas were such advantage exists for South Australia. Recently appointed as a member of the Club of Rome, and recipient of the University of Adelaide James McWha Award for Excellence in 2013 for his contribution to the field of sustainable development, Charlie has a great depth of understanding of the operational nature of sustainability and is committed to South Australia’s future.

“As an emerging international thought leader in sustainable development with over a decade of experience, a session with Charlie Hargroves should not be missed!” David Singleton, Chair, Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

The presentation will be followed immediately by

Linkage Green Drinks

Time: 5:30pm – 6:30pm
Venue: The University of Adelaide
Ground Floor, Nexus 10
10 Pulteney Street

This networking part of the event is focused on developing linkages with industry and government agencies in South Australia. A theme of the event will be to conceive possible projects for the ARC-Linkage 2014 round, along with other collaborative opportunities.

This session will be lightly facilitated by Charlie and Fiona Kerr to encourage you to meet new people that are passionate and active in the same area of sustainability that you are.

The ECIC is proud to provide refreshments for the Green Drinks and it will be held in the impressive foyer of the Nexus 10 Building on the corner of North Terrace and Pulteney Street.

Biography

Charlie is a Sustainable Development Fellow with the ECIC and specialises in carbon structural adjustment. After graduating from the University of Adelaide in 2000, and spending two years as a practicing civil/structural design engineer, Charlie co-founded ‘The Natural Edge Project’ (TNEP), an internationally recognised team of action research academics based at various universities across Australia including the University of Adelaide, Curtin University, QUT, and the ANU. Charlie has led the TNEP team to deliver five international books on sustainable development (selling over 80,000 copies in four languages) in collaboration with some of the world’s leaders in sustainability, such as Gro Brundtland, Ernst von Weisacker, Amory Lovins, Rajendra Pachauri, and Peter Newman. The first book won the Australian Banksia Award for Environmental Leadership, Education and Training in 2005, and the two most recent books were ranked among the ‘Top 40 Sustainability Books’ in the world in 2010 by the Cambridge Sustainability Leaders Program. Charlie is due to complete his PhD on carbon structural adjustment in early 2014, supervised by Professor Peter Newman