EI research shows broad-scale trends in climatic and environmental change in Australia over the past 30 ka

A new paper involving Environment Institute member John Tibby as well as L. Petherick (Queensland University of Technology & The University of Queensland), H. Bostock (National Institute of Water and Atmosphere), T.J. Cohen (The University of Wollongong), K. Fitzsimmons (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology), M.-S. Fletcher (Australian National University & University of Chile), P.Moss (University of Queensland), J. Reeves (University of Ballarat), S. Mooney (University of New South Wales), T. Barrows (University of Exeter), J. Kemp (Northumbria University), J. Jansen (Stockholm University), G. Nanson (University of Wollongong) and A. Dosseto (University of Wollongong) has recently been published in the the journal Quaternary Science Reviews.

John Tibby, one of the researchers involved on the paper

John Tibby, one of the researchers involved on the paper

The paper titled ”Climatic records over the past 30 ka from temperate Australia – a synthesis from the Oz-INTIMATE workgroup’ investigates broad-scale trends in climatic and environmental change in Australia over the past 30 ka.

Temperate Australia sits between the heat engine of the tropics and the cold Southern Ocean, encompassing a range of rainfall regimes and falling under the influence of different climatic drivers, despite this, researchers were able  to synthesise available palaeoenvironmental records and show that it is possible to gain insight into broader scale climatic and environmental variability without losing the intricacies of individual records.

Read the paper to find out more.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s